From the Blog


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Jerry Kicking Butt at the Navy Seal Challenge

 

We want to Thank Dr. Hawley for all his years of some Awesome Information for our Blog – Dr. Hawley is moving onto some bigger adventures and we wish him and his family all him the BEST – THANK YOU Dr. Hawley for all that you did for us here!

Dr. Meg McNicholas-Leggett  from “McNicholas Family Chiropractic” has agreed to continue the Health Corner for Tuesday’s – thanks Meg

SUN IS OUT

So, I don’t know if you all have noticed, but the sun is out, the temp is rising, and the WOD’s are rockin.  Now more than ever we need to stay hydrated.  Hydrate, hydrate, hydrate.  The human body is made up of approximately 70% water.  It makes sense that fluids(water mostly)are vital for the majority of our bodily functions. This includes protecting our joints, maintaining organ function, transporting oxygen to cells, and sustaining body temperature.  

Here are the ten signs that your body is experiencing dehydration.

1. Fatigue sets in.
2. Urine appears dark yellow
3. Sudden lightheadedness
4. Heart rate increases
5. You overheat
6. Muscle cramps (sodium and potassium stores are low)
7. Constipation
8. Skin loses elasticity
9. No more tears or sweat
10. You are parched!!!!!!!

If you notice any of these warning signs, listen to your body, get hydrated, and stay hydrated. Have a healthy and kickbutt week!

Dr. Meg

 


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Reionals in Canton, MASS – sorry some were missing from the photo

 

SUMMER SHRED PROGRAMMING

How’s your motor? By motor we mean your engine and by engine we are talking your breathing during WOD’s! Whether you are a fire breathing beast or a new born soon to be fire breather, here at Factory Square we are proud to introduce our new extra credit post conditioning WODs called SUMMER SHRED! Summer Shred W.O.D. can be done after a class, during open gym or if you’re not feeling the W.O.D. scheduled for that day!  When will these be released? Every Tuesday and Thursday following the post of the daily W.O.D below will be the S.S.W.O.D. (SUMMER SHRED WOD). There you will find out what is on taps for that day!


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Matthew Morgan – Won 1st Place at the CFM Kids Throwdown 8-10yr old Division – Great Job Matthew!!

Dr. Hawley’s Health Corner
Your new best friend – your gluteus maximus!

Lower back health is of the utmost importance to me not only because of my job but having had a few back injuries in the past I know how much these can affect you.  One of the most forgotten parts of lower back injuries and lower back health is the gluteus maximus muscle – also known as your butt!

Your glut. max muscle is the main muscle that is in charge of stabilizing your lower back especially when leaning forward. If this muscle is overused or injured your entire lower back mechanics will be comprised and pain will be the end result.

The reason that I bring up this phenomenon is because several of the exercises we perform at CrossFit can beat up your glut max if your form is a little off. This is super evident when looking at the deadlift. Many times (me included) when someone is performing a deadlift they allow their hips to rise putting a lot of force not only on your lower back but also completely straining your glut max.
Some great ways to correct/prevent your glut max is to spend some time on the foam roller and/or lacrosse ball to clear up those adhesions. Another great way is to spend some extra time performing those exercises that target the glut max such as lungs, deep squats and box step ups.
A weak glut. max is something that is so common due and can lead to several back injuries and could prevent back injuries from healing.
If you have a nagging lower back injury try the above steps to fix and strengthen your new friend – your glut max.

 


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Great Job Linda!!

 

Dr. Hawley’s Health Corner
Your new best friend – your gluteus maximus!

Lower back health is of the utmost importance to me not only because of my job but having had a few back injuries in the past I know how much these can affect you.  One of the most forgotten parts of lower back injuries and lower back health is the gluteus maximus muscle – also known as your butt!

Your glut. max muscle is the main muscle that is in charge of stabilizing your lower back especially when leaning forward. If this muscle is overused or injured your entire lower back mechanics will be comprised and pain will be the end result.

The reason that I bring up this phenomenon is because several of the exercises we perform at CrossFit can beat up your glut max if your form is a little off. This is super evident when looking at the deadlift. Many times (me included) when someone is performing a deadlift they allow their hips to rise putting a lot of force not only on your lower back but also completely straining your glut max.
Some great ways to correct/prevent your glut max is to spend some time on the foam roller and/or lacrosse ball to clear up those adhesions. Another great way is to spend some extra time performing those exercises that target the glut max such as lungs, deep squats and box step ups.
A weak glut. max is something that is so common due and can lead to several back injuries and could prevent back injuries from healing.
If you have a nagging lower back injury try the above steps to fix and strengthen your new friend – your glut max.

 


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5am working hard

Dr. Hawley’s Health Corner

Squatting

Have you ever had a hard time with a certain lifting movement until you heard or saw that one thing that made everything make sense?  Well this happened to me the last time I was watching the MobilityWOD.  For the longest time I couldn’t understand why I was not progressing with my push-press the way I thought I should be until I watched this video – apparently I was starting the movement wrong and was not squatting the right way.  Yes I was told this before but it didn’t really make sense until I saw it and heard him explain why – and no it was not anything that mind blowing.  He simply stated that we should be starting all squatting motions (push-press, box jumps or simply playing basketball) the same way we front squat or back squat.

Just think about the last time you back squatted – did you take the time to set your feet and then make sure your knees went outward instead of forward?  Now think about the last time you push-pressed or jumped – did you perform the same kind of squat first?  If so congratulations you can stop reading this article!!  If not continue reading.

I am not going to try and coach you through the particular movements and how to lift correctly as we have great coaches who are way smarter than I am to do that but I will try to let you know why it is important to maintain the same squatting technique during all these motions.  When you are performing a back squat the knees out cue is used so that you are able to create torsion in your hips and a stable lifting platform.  This is also used to take the tension and torsion out of your knee and prevent any knee injuries that could result.  Doesn’t it make sense that this should be done with any movement that involves squatting motion?  Not only does the knee out cue provide a stable lifting platform but it will also provide more strength as you will be jumping or push-pressing from a stronger base then a stronger end.

To take this one step further this knee’s out squat should be used during ALL your daily activities not just those activities that are done at SCF!  How many times do you sit and stand a day?  Now ask yourself how many times you sit and stand properly – I bet the answer is far less than the first.  Each time you stand up with your knees ahead of your toes you are putting unneeded stress on your knee.   This causes these tissues to be tightened more than necessary which can set you up for injury later.

From now one try to pay attention to each time you stand, sit or perform movements that start with a squat and try to do the same exact motion for all of these movements.  If you happen to hang around fellow members of CrossFit Factory Square feel free to call them out if you see them sitting or standing wrong throughout the day and make them do 10 burpees each time you catch them!

 


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Ellie and Andrea

Power Clean Guide – This may help with tomorrows WOD, Good thing to review!

Main Muscle: Hamstrings

Note: This exercise is extremely complex and requires the execution of many phases.

Phase 1: Starting Position

  1. Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart and toes pointing out slightly.
  2. Squat down and grasp bar with a closed, pronated grip. Your hands should be slightly wider than shoulder width apart outside knees with elbows fully extended.
  3. Place the bar about 1 inch in front of your shins and over the balls of your feet.
  4. Your back should be flat or slightly arched, your chest held up and out and your shoulder blades should be retracted.
  5. Keep your head in a neutral position (in line with vertebral column and not tilted or rotated) with your eyes focused straight ahead. Inhale during this phase.

Phase 2: First Pull Phase

  1. Lift the bar from the floor by forcefully extending the hips and the knees as you exhale.Tip: The upper torso should maintain the same angle. Do not bend at the waist yet and do not let the hips rise before the shoulders (this would have the effect of pushing the glutes in the air and stretching the hamstrings.
  2. Keep elbows fully extended with the head in a neutral position and the shoulders over the bar.
  3. As the bar raises keep it as close to the shins as possible.

Phase 3: Transition or Scoop Phase

  1. As the bar passes the knees, thrust your hips forward and slightly bend the knees to avoid locking them. Tip: At this point your thighs should be against the bar.
  2. Keep the back flat or slightly arched, elbows fully extended and your head neutral. Tip:You will hold your breath until the next phase.

Phase 4: Second Pull Phase

  1. Inhale and then forcefully and quickly extend your hips and knees and stand on your toes.
  2. Keep the bar as close to your body as possible. Tip: Your back should be flat with the elbows pointed out to the sides and your head in a neutral position. Also, keep your shoulders over the bar and arms straight as long as possible.
  3. When your lower body joints are fully extended, shrug the shoulders upward rapidly without letting the elbows flex yet. Exhale during this portion of the movement.
  4. As the shoulders reach their highest elevation flex your elbows to begin pulling your body under the bar.
  5. Continue to pull the arms as high and as long as possible. Tip: Due to the explosive nature of this phase, your torso will be erect or with an arched back, your head will be tilted back slightly and your feet may lose contact with the floor.

Phase 5: Catch Phase

  1. After the lower body has fully extended and the bar reaches near maximal height, pull your body under the bar and rotate the arms around and under the bar.
  2. Simultaneously, flex the hips and knees into a quarter squat position.
  3. Once the arms are under the bar, inhale and then lift your elbows to position the upper arms parallel to the floor. Rack the bar across the front of your collar bones and front shoulder muscles.
  4. Catch the bar with an erect and tight torso, a neutral head position and flat feet. Exhale during this movement.
  5. Stand up by extending the hips and knees to a fully erect position.

Phase 6: Downward Movement Phase

  1. Lower the bar by gradually reducing the muscular tension of the arms to allow a controlled descent of the bar to the thighs. Inhale during this movement.
  2. Simultaneously flex the hips and knees to cushion the impact of the bar on the thighs.
  3. Squat down with the elbows fully extended until the bar touches the floor.
  4. Start over at Phase 1 and repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.